Smartphone overuse might worsen pain and sleep quality among individuals with migraine

Smartphone overuse has become an increasingly common problem among people of all ages. Recent research has found that this type of technology use could be contributing to worsening pain and sleep quality among individuals with migraine.

Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by severe, recurrent headaches. It can be a debilitating condition that can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life. In addition to the physical pain, migraine sufferers can also experience symptoms such as nausea, fatigue, sensitivity to light and sound, and difficulty sleeping.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, found that people with migraine who used their smartphones more than two hours per day were more likely to experience higher levels of pain and poorer sleep quality than those who used their phones less. The researchers also found that those who used their phones more than two hours per day were more likely to experience more severe headaches and more frequent attacks.

The study’s authors suggest that the blue light emitted from smartphones may be contributing to the worsening of migraine symptoms. They suggest that limiting smartphone use to less than two hours per day may help to reduce the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks.

The study’s authors also suggest that people with migraine should consider using blue-light-blocking glasses or apps to reduce the amount of blue light that their eyes are exposed to. They also suggest that people with migraine should avoid using their phones in dark environments, as this can make symptoms worse.

In conclusion, this study suggests that smartphone overuse may be contributing to worsening pain and sleep quality among individuals with migraine. Limiting smartphone use to less than two hours per day and using blue-light-blocking glasses or apps may help to reduce the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks.

A recent study published in Brain and Behavior has found a link between smartphone usage and migraine symptomology. 400 adults who used smartphones for more than 30 minutes a day were recruited from two neurology clinics in Pakistan. The participants were divided into a high mobile phone use group and a low mobile phone use group. Results showed that those in the high mobile phone use group had higher pain intensity, worse sleep quality, and more physical discomfort than those in the low mobile phone use group. The low phone usage group reported higher disability levels, while the high usage group reported less effectiveness of treatments. These findings suggest that frequent cellphone usage could worsen pain associated with migraines, lessen sleep, and reduce the effectiveness of treatments. Although this research is a step in the right direction, there are limitations to consider, such as the cross-sectional design of the study and the reliance on self-report measures. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms behind the association between smartphone usage and migraine symptomology, as well as to identify effective treatments for those affected.

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